Bringing a touch of class to your garden

Yorkshire Flowerpots list of things to do:

At Yorkshire Flowerpots we have put our heads together to put together a list of things you can do throughout they year to get the most out of your green fingered efforts!

January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December

THINGS TO DO IN JANUARY?

  • Ensure that birds have food and water
  • Continue with winter digging when soild conditions allow
  • Cover ground to keep out the wet
  • Order seeds and summer-flowering bulbs
  • Protect plants that are vulnerable to wind and cold
  • Aerate lawns to improve drainage
  • Keep a small area of ponds free from ice
  • Keep on top of winter-germinating weeds
  • Refirm newly planted trees and shrubs if lifted by frost
  • Brush snow off trees and shrubs so branches don’t break
  • Check supports of trees and shrubs
  • Plant deciduous hedgings
  • Prune trees and shrubs to shape
  • Prune wisteria and other vigorous climbers
  • Clear damp leaves from the crowns of plants
  • Check forced bulbs for growth
  • Sow sweet peas under cover
  • Protect fruit trees from bird damage
  • Chit early potatoes
  • Continue planting and winter-pruning of fruit
  • Force Rhubarb

THIS IS YOUR LAST CHANCE TO….

  • Protect container plants from freezing spells
  • Insulate outside taps

GET IN FRONT….

    • Send the lawnmower off for servicing!

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THINGS TO DO IN FEBRUARY?

  • Top up the food and water supplies for garden birds
  • Apply organic-based fertilisers
  • If the weather allows continue to plant trees and shrubs
  • If newly planted trees and shrubs have been lifted by frost firm them back into the ground
  • Prune winter-flowering shrubs that have finished flowering
  • If summer-flowering shrubs have flowered on new wood, prune them
  • Prune hardy evergreen trees and shrubs
  • Prune jasmines and later-summer-flowering clematis
  • Top-dress or repot shrubs in containers
  • Prune off old stems of herbaceous perennials
  • Start dahlia tubers into growth
  • Divide and plant snowdrops
  • Bring the last of the spring bulbs being forced inside
  • Prepare seedbeds for vegetables
  • Lime vegetable plots if necessary
  • Continue planting fruit trees and bushes
  • Mulch fruit trees after feeding

THIS IS YOUR LAST CHANCE TO….

  • Cut back overgrown shrubs and hedges before the nesting season starts
  • Finish pruning fruit

GET IN FRONT….

  • Make sure that all pots and seed trays are clean
  • Check your stocks of pots, compost and labels
  • Check tools, equipment and plant supports are sound

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THINGS TO DO IN MARCH?

  • Mulch bare soil in borders and beds
  • Move evergreen shrubs
  • Reseed bare patches on the lawn
  • Mow lawns regularly
  • Retrieve pumps from store and put them in the pond
  • Prune bush and shrub roses
  • Prune shrubs with colourful winter stems
  • Renovate climbers and plant new ones
  • Lift and divide overgrown clumps of perennials
  • Split polyanthus after flowering
  • Plant summer-flowering bulbs
  • Sow hardy annuals where they are to flower
  • Sow sweet peas outdoors or plant our young plants
  • Pinch out tips of young sweet peas to encourage sideshoots
  • Water indoor plants regularly, now the weather is warmer
  • Protect young, tender plants from slugs
  • Cut down old growth left over winter
  • Sow vegetables outside
  • Plant early potatoes

THIS IS YOUR LAST CHANCE TO….

  • Finish planting bare-root trees and shrubs, and new fruit trees and bushes
  • Plant snowdrops and winter aconites

GET IN FRONT….

  • Put stakes and other plant supports in before the new growth really needs them.

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THINGS TO DO IN APRIL?

  • Continue watering new trees and shrubs when dry
  • Feed established lawns
  • Plant new aquatic plants
  • Plant evergreen trees and shrubs
  • Erect windbreaks around new trees and shrubs if needed
  • Trim grey-leaved shrubs to keep them bushy
  • Tie in the new shoots of climbers
  • Prune early-flowering shrubs
  • Prune shrubs grown for large or colourful foliage
  • Divide perennials
  • Stake tall-growing perennials
  • Protect young growth from slugs and snails
  • Remove annual weeds with your hands
  • Remove perennials weeds by digging them out
  • Deadhead daffodils
  • Sow annual climbers and grasses
  • Continue sowing and planting vegetables outdoors
  • Plant container-grown fruit trees

THIS IS YOUR LAST CHANCE TO….

  • Cut down any dead growth that has been left on perennials over winter, especially on grasses, as new shoots are at risk of being damaged
  • Plant summer-flowering bulbs
  • Sow sweet peas

GET IN FRONT….

  • Prune spring-flowering shrubs like forsythia immediately after they have bloomed to encourage new growth to flower next year

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THINGS TO DO IN MAY?

  • Water plants that need it regularly
  • Protect young plants from slugs
  • Replenish water plants with aquatic fertiliser
  • Feed fish regularly
  • Feed, weed and mow lawns to encourage good growth
  • Cover plants with horticultural fleece whenever night frosts are forecast
  • Prune spring-flowering shrubs that have finished flowering
  • Prune Clematis Montana after flowering
  • Trim box and other formal hedging lightly
  • Move tender shrubs in pots outside for summer
  • Divide and cut back spring-flowering perennials
  • Plant out dahlias at the end of the mouth
  • Clear out spring bedding
  • Harden off summer bedding plants
  • Thin out annuals sown earlier
  • Thin out vegetables sown earlier
  • Sow and plant out tender vegetables later this month
  • Protect crops from carrot fly
  • Continue seccessional sowing of vegetables.

THIS IS YOUR LAST CHANCE TO….

  • Finish planting evergreen shrubs

GET IN FRONT….

  • Sow biennials for next year’s spring bedding plants
  • Inspect plants regularly for signs of pests and diseases, and nip potential problems in the bud!!

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THINGS TO DO IN JUNE?

  • Weed and deadhead to maintain beds, borders and container displays
  • Introduce new fish into the pond
  • Remove blanket weed and duckweed to prevent them clogging up water features
  • Mow the lawn and trim edges regularly
  • Energise tired lawns with a liquid feed
  • Water new lawns made in the Spring
  • Water containers regularly as temperatures rise
  • Water new and young plants as necessary
  • Prune spring-flowering shrubs
  • Watch for pests and suckers on roses
  • Tidy and cut back spring-flowering perennials
  • Take cuttings from pinks
  • Sow seed of perennials
  • Cut down the faded foliage of bulbs
  • Lift and divide overgrown clumps of bulbs
  • Plant out summer bedding in containers
  • Harvest vegetables as they mature
  • Plant winter brassicas, and protect them from pests
  • Water fruit and vegetables thoroughly during dry spells

THIS IS YOUR LAST CHANCE TO….

  • Plant new plants before the summer heats up
  • Sow hardy annuals outside to flower this year
  • Plant out tender vegetables such as tomatoes and runner beans to get good crops

GET IN FRONT….

  • Peg down strawberry runners to make new plants
  • Plant summer bedding now that the threat of frost has passed.
  • Inspect plants regularly for signs of pests and diseases, and nip potential problems in the bud!!

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THINGS TO DO IN JULY?

  • Feed and water all plants in containers regularly
  • Tall growing perennials herbaceous subjects may need some support if it isn’t already in place.
  • Prune shrubs that flowered in early summer
  • Most gardeners give their borders a feed and top dress in the Spring but a further dressing now is very beneficial, particularly if applied after cutting down any early flowering subjects
  • Summer-rune wisteria
  • Deadhead flowers as they fade
  • After rose flowers have shed their petals it is important to deadhead.  This helps a good second flush of new flowers in a few weeks time
  • Divide bearded irises
  • After the flag iris have finished flowering, they will benefit from a dressing of Epsom Salts.  This will encourage better blooms for next year
  • Layer and take cuttings of carnations and pinks
  • Plant autumn-flowering bulbs
  • Transplant seedlings of biennials sown earlier
  • The vegetable plot should be yielding all the results of previous hard work which is very rewarding.  Keep small sowings of the salad crops going for a good continuity – radish, for instance, can be sown every week but don’t forget to keep it well watered to prevent the roots going ‘pithy’

THIS IS YOUR LAST CHANCE TO….

  • Fill any gaps in beds and borders with bedding
  • Sow the last vegetables for harvesting in Autumn
  • Plant out all winter brassicas
  • If next Spring’s wallflowers have not been sown yet, don’t delay, otherwise it will be too late.

GET IN FRONT….

  • Make plans to ensure plants are cared for if you are taking your holiday
  • Order Spring-flowering bulbs

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THINGS TO DO IN AUGUST?

  • Feed and water plants in containers
  • Prune rambling roses after flowering
  • Trim lavender after the flowers have faded
  • Take cuttings from tender perennials
  • The vegetable garden should be in full production now – weather permitting – and it’s not too late to make a sowing of salad crops for continuity.  Thought should be given to sowing winter lettuce (both greenhouse and protected outside) crops.
  • The beginning of the month is not too late to sow Winter cropping spinach and prepare for Winter spring onions and spring cabbage for next year.
  • Regularly feed crops such as onions, leeks and celery for best results
  • If your clematis montana has become overgrown and straggly, now is the time to thin it out.
  • Cut back the old flowers of delphuniums – this will encourage new growth and possibly another flush of flowers later on.
  • Dahlias are gross feeders, so keep them fed for continuous supplies of cut flowers.  If you don’t cut the flowers for the house regularly, keep deadheading for continuity.
  • If your bearded iris need transplanting now is the time to do it.  Lift the plants carefully and then cut the foliage back leaving about a third of the growth.
  • Replant the rhizomes in groups of 3 or 5 taking care to properly bury the roots but you must ensure that the top half of the rhizome is left exposed.
  • Flowers grown for drying off eg statice, helichrysum etc may have suffered with wet weather.  If they survive and the flowers don’t rot, they can be cut for use later or when they’re ready.  Cut them on a dry day and bunch them up, then hang the bunches upside down in an airy place.
  • Don’t forget to keep the baskets, tubs and containers well watered and fed
  • If you are going on holiday move pots into the shade

THIS IS YOUR LAST CHANCE TO….

  • Don’t delay in cutting back any unwanted wispy laterals of wisteria by half their length
  • Plant colchicums for Autumn flowering

GET IN FRONT….

  • Force hyacinths for Christmas
  • Start planting Spring bulbs, especially daffodils
  • Divide perennials towards the end of the month
  • Sow parsley and pot up herbs for later use

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THINGS TO DO IN SEPTEMBER?

  • Start planting new trees, shrubs and climbers
  • Stop feeding trees and shrubs in containers
  • Feed camellias, rhododendrons and azaleas with a high potash feed for a better display next year.
  • Clear out summer bedding plants
  • Why not try taking cuttings of pansies and violas?  They are easy to do and at the same time it will encourage more basal growth in the parent plant and help it keep a better shape and prolong the flowering period.
  • If you haven’t already done it, trim back the old flowers of lavender.  A regular trim (rather than a prune) will keep the plants in good shape and prevent them going too ‘leggy’ – never cut low into old wood.
  • Start planting new perennials
  • Start dividing overgrown perennials
  • Support tall, later-flowering perennials
  • Daffodils and crocus should be planted at the earliest opportunity.  Tulips can be left until later
  • Plant out spring-flowering biennials
  • September can be a busy time in the garden – both vegetable and flower.  If  you want to save some seeds from some of your favourite plants, now is the time to do it if the pods are ripe.  Choose a dry period to cut the pods and then store them in paper bags until the seed naturally falls from the pod
  • Plant up containers with spring bedding
  • If you are a dahlia grower, keep them well watered and fed and don’t forget to deadhead old flowers from stems that haven’t been cut for the home.
  • If you have an earwig problem there are two things you can do.  1) Stuff a 9cm (3 1/2″) flowerpot with straw or hay and place this upside down on a stake or cane.  The earwigs will inhabit this overnight and can then be removed the next morning.  2) Smear some washing-up liquid on the stem below the flower/bud.

THIS IS YOUR LAST CHANCE TO….

  • Force hyacinths for Christmas
  • Plant Autumn onion sets
  • Sow Spring cabbages
  • Plant new strawberry plants

GET IN FRONT….

  • Sow hardy annuals to flower next year
  • Dig over heavy clay soil before Autumn rains make it less workable

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THINGS TO DO IN OCTOBER?

  • Finish planting evergreen shrubs
  • Plant new climbers
  • Plant new perennials
  • Plant tulip and lily bulbs
  • Divide overgrown perennials
  • Lift and store dahlias, gladioli and summer flowering bulbs
  • Cut down the dying tops of perennials vegetables
  • Lift and divide rhubarb
  • Rake up fallen leaves, and pile them up to make leafmould
  • Continue clearing up the garden, and burn or bin debris, that shows signs of funal infection
  • Dig over empty areas of soil
  • Tidy ponds and remove pumps for the Winter

THIS IS YOUR LAST CHANCE TO….

  • Finish planting spring bedding
  • Finish planting spring flowering bulbs

GET IN FRONT….

  • Prepare for planting bare-rooted stock next month
  • Make early sowing of broad beans for next year
  • Sow sweet peas for next year under cover

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THINGS TO DO IN NOVEMBER?

  • Tidy the garden for winter
  • Clear our bird boxes, and put food out for birds
  • Check the bonfire heap for hibernating creatures before lighting it
  • Continue with winter digging
  • Clean or throw out old pots and trays
  • Keep off the lawn in frosty weather
  • Install pond heaters
  • Plant bare-rooted trees and shrubs and new roses
  • Plant fruit trees and bushes
  • Protect tender and newly planted shrubs from frost and wind
  • Plant tulip bulbs
  • Continue to lift and divide rhubarb crowns
  • Winter-prune fruit trees and bushes

THIS IS YOUR LAST CHANCE TO….

  • Lift and store dahlias
  • Start of amaryllis bulbs to flower at Christmas
  • Plant out spring bedding
  • Plant garlic

GET IN FRONT….

  • Order seed catalogues
  • Begin any winter-pruning of deciduous trees and shrubs, including renovation of hedges

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THINGS TO DO IN DECEMBER?

  • Feed birds in cold weather (buy special bird food rather than leaving out household scraps, as seed and nut mixtures provide a better diet for birds)
  • Hedgehogs like a heap of leaves to winter in, so leave the odd pile in an out-of-the-way corner of the garden.
  • Do not allow ponds and bird baths to freeze over
  • Continue winter digging, incorporating organic matter
  • Clean paths, and repair sheds and fenches
  • Repair lawns if weather conditions allow
  • Shred the prunings from ornamental plants and fruit trees and bushes
  • Prune woody ornamental plants and fruit trees and bushes
  • Prune ornamental vines
  • Shake snow off trees, shrubs and hedges
  • Water under cover plants sparingly to avoid the risk of overwatering and rotting
  • Tend to pot plants to get the best of their winter display.
  • Bring bay trees under cover to protect them from cold
  • Earth up tall Brussels sprout stems to support them

THIS IS YOUR LAST CHANCE TO….

  • Protect plants vulnerable to frost damage
  • Insulate garden taps and exposed pipes
  • Prune tall bush roses to guard against wind rock
  • Bring in Christmas bulbs for flowering

GET IN FRONT….

  • Start Winter digging before Christmas, particularly on heavy clay soils, so the weather can break down the soil before Spring arrives.  This will make preparing seedbeds easier

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